Mitt Romney’s real problem, not the loss of white house dream


Mitt Romney came back to public eyes when he was interviewed by Fox, the first major one since his loss last November. He said, “It kills me” to have lost election to Obama.

The guy is not a good loser. It took him over four months to nurse back from the wound he suffered over his loss of white house dream.

The main problem with Romney is he only had white house dream, but does not have a life’s mission. White house is the vessel or an instrument to accomplish a mission. You got to have some more transcendental purpose or larger-than-life goal in life.

For a man with a life’s mission, if one instrument fails or one vessel sinks, try another one, as long as he doesn’t abandon his life’s mission. And I don’t believe age restricts a person.

See my favorite ex-president Jimmy Carter, and another ex-vice Al Gore. Especially Al Gore after he lost the election to the little Bush.



Paul Ryan, a highly effective politician, part II


Ryan majored in economics and political science as an undergraduate, so he quickly decided that the Budget Committee was where he wanted to be.

Following the advices of Barney Frank and Bill Thomas, he threw himself into the world of economic policy wonks, consulting with experts whenever he needed and doing whatever he could to get knowledgeable on the topic.

By 2007, the beginning of his fifth term, he had worked his way up to the highest position available to a Republican on the Democratic-controlled House Budget Committee: ranking member, the title not only giving one prestige and authority but also access to the actuaries and economists at the Congressional Budget Office.

By 2011, Ryan became the Chairperson of the House Budget Committee. He was only 41 years old. Ryan has provided a living example on how to climb up his career ladder in the shortest possible time.



Paul Ryan, a highly effective politician, part I


Last month, while reading The Price of Politics by Bob Woodward, 2012, I shared this part with my daughter. It talks about Paul Ryan and how he rose so quickly as a politician. Here’s what Bod Woodward wrote of him, pp. 82-84.

Paul Ryan was 29 years old when he first became the member of the US House of Representative. He believed his most important challenge was learning how to be an effective lawmaker, and he began charting a path right away. Having lost his father at the age of 16, he had always sought mentors, … Now he reached out again, asking a number of the House’s senior members to breakfast or lunch, seeking guidance.

There were two persons from whom he benefited most. The first one was Barney Frank. Though they were ideological opposites, Frank gave him what Ryan considered the best advice he got about how to be an effective congressman. Be a specialist, Frank told him, not a generalist. Focus on one set of issues. Get on the committee that you care about, and then learn more about the topic than anybody else.

Second, Bill Thomas told him to talk to all the experts you can find, and read everything you can. Know these things inside and out so that you really know what you are talking about whenever you talk.
To be continued…


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